Pegasus Capital

Having been involved in the loan and capital markets for more than 25 years, the founding partners of Pegasus Capital wanted to use their wealth of experience and technical expertise to assist corporates and their advisers navigate the complex world of hedging and derivatives.

The idea was to create a bridge between the commercial and financial markets and assist clients by utilising the knowledge gained working on the trading floors of some of the worlds’ largest investment banks. In so doing, Pegasus would work with clients to understand the financing options available to them and preparing them to enter into meaningful negotiations with their financing partners.

Once the Partners had the concept of bridging in mind it made sense to incorporate this into the company name. It was after a trip to Normandy that the Partners decided that the story of Pegasus Bridge encapsulated the theme and Pegasus Capital LLP was created;

On the night of June 5th 1944, Pegasus Bridge was the first part of mainland Europe to be liberated as part of Operation Deadstick. Lots of preparation, experience and planning went into the dangerous mission of landing behind enemy lines and ensuring the capture of the bridge. The mission was vital to the success of the British airborne landings and failure to capture the bridges intact, or to prevent their demolition by the Germans, would leave the 6th Airborne Division cut off from the rest of the Allied armies with their backs to the two waterways. If the mission failed, the Germans would be able to use their armoured divisions to curtail any advance from the British troops landing on Sword beach.

Thorough planning, preparation and execution, combined with knowledge and experience, are key to achieving the objectives that Pegasus have in working with clients. This ensures that their financing needs are well thought through, appropriate to their business needs and transacted at a commensurate level.

Find out more about Pegasus Bridge.

A View from the Bridge - July 2017

The primary driver of the recent rise in UK swap rates has been a more hawkish tilt from certain members of the Bank of England’s monetary policy committee. This has been predicated on more recent inflation outturns coming in above levels anticipated when the BOE last published its quarterly inflation forecasts in early May and that CPI will rise above the 3% level in the coming months before moderating as past effects of foreign exchange rate weakness work their way through the economy.

PegasusCapital - Thu 3rd Aug